Stop Losing Money With Poor Presentation Skills

Whether you are using whiteboard to get new ideas, run office brainstorms or give client pitches, one thing is certain. Poor presentation skills will cost you A LOT of money.

Presenting with a whiteboard is the fast and easy way to dramatically improve your ideas, process and results. Use this simple step-by-step whiteboard workout to boost your skills to a new level.

Step 1. Use A Storyboard To Plan For Impact
Organize the creative and logical flow of your story for your whiteboard presentation. A storyboard is a frame-by-frame blueprint of the sequence of ideas, as well as the details of each part of your presentation.

Benefit: Feel confident in front of a big group! Just imagine. You won’t have to wrack your brain trying to figure out what to do next.

Step 2. Write And Draw Your Ideas
Instead of being a ‘text-only’ presenter, use pictures and words to stimulate fresh ideas and innovative thinking. If you are hopeless at drawing, don’t worry. There are now easy reference guides teaching you exactly how to look like a pro, using a marker. One of the most valuable resources is a video tutorial showing how to draw on flipcharts and whiteboards.

Hint: Simple drawings have a high impact on flipcharts and whiteboards.

Benefit: You will connect with any audience. According to academic research from Stanford and Wharton, 60% of people are visual learners. Plus, kinesthetic learners account for an additional 25%. People with this learning style prefer to see the big picture before they take action.

Now, do the math. That’s 85% of the population that prefers to see information visually. With pictures and words, you’ll connect precisely with how 85% of participants learn – and make decisions.

Step 3. Connect With Hot Issues
The best presentations have a strong emotional connection with issues, problems and concerns of your audience. Do the extra legwork to find out what’s really top of mind for your participants. Informational interviews, informal conversations, and research are your best bets.

Benefit: Your audience listens. Instead of looking out at a sea of glazed stares, people are more likely to sit on the edge of their seats

Step 4. Write, Draw and Move
Naturally, you must stand in front of a traditional whiteboard or dry- erase board. It’s essential to write and draw. This means your back is briefly to the audience. While most presentation experts warn you: “Never turn your back to the audience,” it’s impossible at a whiteboard.

The solution: write, draw and move out of the way. Stay light on your feet. Step to the side so people can see what is on the board.

Benefit: Your audience sees what the story as it develops. Rather than staring at your backside, they watch an organic flow of words, pictures and story.

Step 5. Ignite Interaction
Get your audience involved. Ask questions and record answers. Use the whiteboard to promote, encourage and invite interaction.

While interactive whiteboards use electronic features to encourage interaction, you can achieve great results using a standard dry-erase board. Interaction is an attitude and commitment. As your comfort grows in guiding and facilitating interaction, your whiteboard presentations will be much more lively – and effective.

Benefit: Your audience participates. This is exactly why you’re using a whiteboard in the first place.

Step 6. Focus on Specific Action
Plan your entire whiteboard presentation to inspire, motivate and create a magnetic call to action. While this is true in every business presentation, with whiteboard presentations specific selling instructions are easier to deliver.

For instance, write the call to action. Draw icons to represent the benefits of action. Focus arrows on the action. Define the value of taking action in dollars, time and effort.

Benefit: Selling with whiteboard presentations inspires action. Your confused, overworked and stressed-out clients and prospects know exactly what to do.

Bottom line: Stop losing money with poor presentation skills. With the right whiteboard selling skills, you’ll win results. In fact, you’re most likely to be unstoppable.

How To Create Persuasive Sales Presentations In Minutes

Yes, minutes-not hours. Not days. Not all weekend. Not anymore. If you’re ready to connect with customers and prospects and share your solutions-here is the quick and easy way to design highly persuasive sales presentations.

Sales presenting is a critical part of professional business. If you’re good at it…you’re prepared. You’re also well ahead of the curve of folks who are suffering under these false assumptions:

A. I’m more creative ad-hoc

This is a scary belief. If you are telling yourself this fiction, watch out. If you hear it from a co-worker or teammate, challenge it.

Creativity is best when you’ve got a solid story structure and have rehearsed like wild.

B. I’m best when I wing it

Variation on a theme. Do not fall for this illusion. Winging it is a joke. Even if you’re a pro. Even if you’ve done it before. Even if you have a very attractive alternative for how to spend your time before your pitch.

Don’t fall for this kind of thinking. It can be a cover-up story you’re telling to yourself to avoid hard work.

C. I already pitched to this group before

Things change. People change. You’ve changed. If you’re going to be at the top of your game, approach your presentation with fresh eyes and new enthusiasm.

Relying on a dusted off presentation is a really bad idea.

O.K. Now that we got those out of the way, what are you going to do to create powerful sales presentation-fast?

Follow these 6 steps and you’ll be off to a great start.

1. Start With Targeting The Client’s Problems

Based in your research and understanding, identify the top problems your client faces. Start here. Show that you understand, know and are listening to your client’s true needs.

2. Prioritize Options

In traditional newspapers, articles were written with the most important facts and news first. Then, if the editor needed to cut the story, they would cut off the bottom-which contained less important information.

Approach your presentation planning the same way. Organize key concepts by importance. Then, if you need or want, you can skip the less important points based on time and client interest.

3. Highlight Benefits

Building your presentation on your client’s top priorities, structure your story. Using a presentation storyboard is the fastest and easiest way to plot your strategy, organize the time and highlight important benefits.

While your company may offer several types of services such as consulting, training and sales presenting-focus on the specific benefits that address your client’s issues.

Many sales presenters neglect to consider this point. They may find certain benefits more intriguing or important. But what you prefer is not crucial. Focus benefits to connect-the-dots with the problems your client wants to solve.

4. Engage and Interact

Old-school selling often encouraged sellers to: “tell, tell, tell.” Instead, organize your presentation to include times for the audience to interact. Plan your sales presentation with ample time for discussion, Q & A, and client interaction.

Hint: do this early on. The sooner you hear what is important to your client, the better. You’ll be able to adapt and flex your message to match the mood.

5. Personalize With Relevant Examples

Be the person everyone wants to listen to. Share your personal experience through short, powerful and relevant examples. This is where practice and rehearsal really pay off.

Work through your potential examples with your presentation coach. Practice sharing anecdotes. Speak briefly. Share your story with passion.

6. Finish With Clear Compelling Message

It’s often said that people remember the beginning and end of a sales presentation-more than anything else. End on a bang, people will recall you, your brand and your offer.

If you must make a decision to cut a section in order to end with impact, slice away. Take a surgical approach to send the strongest message in the shorter amount of time.

Using these 6 tips, you will be able to create persuasive sales presentations in minutes-not days.

Public Speaking: The Most Important Part of Any Presentation

Through your talk, you’ll provide information. However, you really want your audience to do something with that information. Even if it’s only that they think about what you’ve said and then smile. So many great presentations go off the rails because the speaker concentrates on what they’ll say, without having spent sufficient time on why. It’s vital that you know what you want your audience to do. Answer that question before anything else. Then build everything in your presentation from that base. For instance, you might want your audience to:

1. Know more about health and safety in the workplace, (you inform) so that they create a better environment for everyone working there (they act);

2. Understand Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) better (you inform) so that they can support their family or friend who has recently been diagnosed (they act);

3. Gain a better understanding of the wonderful work done by your charity (you inform), so that they donate to your organisation (they act);

4. Understand a film better (you inform) so that they can better answer questions about it on an exam (they act);

5. Be very clear about your political Party’s policy platform on Aged healthcare, (you inform) so that your audience of elderly people vote for you or your Party in the next election (they act).

For All Speeches and Short Talks, Answer These Questions

(1) Is your role to inform, persuade or entertain – or all three?

(2) What is the key objective of your talk? Write it out in a few words. For example, you might write: I’m giving this talk about _________ to _________ because I want them to:___________________.

In that last, very important, part of the sentence you must know what it is you want people to do. Two examples are:

1. I’m giving this talk about AIDS to the local Rotary Club because I want to raise money for a new hospice program.

2. I’m giving this talk about the new Occupational Health and Safety legislation to senior hospital administrators because I want them to develop appropriate programs to protect Nurses’ safety, state-wide.

Once you know what you want people to do, and why, it will be much easier for you to brainstorm the content of your talk. Your next step is to spell out clearly what you want the audience to do, how, and in what timeframe.

For example, if you’re keen to recruit more volunteers to help your organisation, instead of saying: “we desperately need more volunteers”, provide information about a definite task, a time and a place where they can help with that task. That can be much more motivating to your audience than a vague claim that you need volunteers. Why? People can easily see themselves cleaning up one beach on one Sunday morning with lots of other people. So spell it out.

If you want their money. Say so. Tell people about your amazing achievements, all done with minimal government help. Then spell out very clearly that the new building renovations will cost $120,800 because you’ve secured a special in-kind donation from Company X – valued at $Y. Then be even more explicit. You need to raise that amount in three months. Ideally, you and your group will have organized raffle tickets or some tangible means to raise money. If not, it might be that you’re looking for sponsors whose names will be placed on a special plaque.

If your talk has been about passing on knowledge – eg how to set up a small business – you need to be very clear and specific about how your listeners can learn more. Have some hand-out material for them as a follow up guide to more study, books (preferably yours) and multi media resources. Apply what you’ve told them in your talk: if you gave people an outline of the planning process, you could tell them to “start this very day with the first part of my plan.”

Then, because you’re a lovely person, you’ll tell them again what the first three steps were. Finally, let people know that you are available by e-mail or at a particular organisation to work with them through any point that wasn’t clear. Not everything in life is about marketing. Please don’t finish your presentation by blatantly ‘selling’ your advanced courses and your books and so on. By all means, include that sort of information as part of your introduction, and as part of hand-out material.